• 06-MAY-2015

  • SOURCE: CNH Industrial

Case IH Axial-Flow Combine Harvester delivers convincing performance threshing soya

Case IH Axial-Flow Combine Harvester
The soya bean is renowned as the queen of leguminous grain crops and is currently in great demand , not least in the quest for new sources of protein supply, in many of the cultivation regions of Europe. This increased interest in the planting of soya has been strengthened by the new possibilities for soya in the context of 'greening', i.e. the planting of soya as an ecologically sound and preferred crop.
In Austria, Saatbau Linz provides the most appropriate and highest yielding grades of this crop.

However, it has to be said that soya beans also imposespecial challenges on the harvesting process. If soya is stored for too long in excessive quantities, or if the lower pods are too low, high levels of crop loss can rapidly ensue. Therefore there is great significance in having the optimum harvesting process, as well as the right threshing time and and correct level of crop humidity.

Suitable for use as a seed crop - even for the planting of soya
For years,Case IH Axial-Flow combine harvesters have proven their capabilities in respect of increasing yields of seed crops, not least because their threshing operations are gentle, resulting in low levels of grain damage. Against this background, the suitability of Case IH Axial-Flow combine harvesters was demonstrated to customers at a practical threshing day at the end of September 2014, also attended by staff from Saatbau Linz, the seed crop supplier. A new Case IH Axial-Flow 7240 combine harvester, equipped with the new 3020 Flex cutter, was used at this demonstration. The test area involved was a soya bean field with an average yield of 3.5 tons per hectare - harvested at 16 percent crop humidity.

These conditions enabled the Axial-Fow combine harvester to showcase its strengths, e.g. in respect of the performance capability of the Axial Flow rotor. The optimised ST rotor on the new 240 Series guarantees ultimate performance in soya harvest, being able to deliver great throughput even under poor harvesting conditions.

Thanks to the gentle threshing process and the effective screening out of residual grains, the Axial-Fow principle also helps to prevent grain loss in the field and to reduce the level of chaff in the grain tank by a substantial margin, as the practical tests were able to demonstrate.

Even at low rotor speeds (400 rpm), high crop harvesting speeds were achieved in the front area of the rotor and these gave rise to an effective and protective centrifugal separation process for the grains. As a consequence, no additional components, such as external accelerator drums, were required.

The new 3020 Flex cutter contributed towards this success and it extends the range of Case IH cutting gear options for this year's harvest. It was developed specifically to maximise productivity and to prevent losses in soya bean harvest and that of all seed crops which need to be cut close to the ground.

This new cutting gear distinguishes itself from other models by virtue of its new and flexible cutter blade bar. This comprises a fully adjustable attachment system that adjusts in response to surface irregularities - even at low height settings - without digging into the ground. The ground clearance of the cutter system can be adjusted manually, or optionally from the cab of the combine harvester, and this proved to be very successful during the threshing of soya bean crops in 2014, at times under very arduous harvesting conditions with heavy stock and high humidity.

To demonstrate a comparison for preservation of intact grain, a hand-rubbed sample was contrasted to a soya bean harvested by the combine harvester. The manually harvested sample on the field delivered 98 percent normal, 2 percent abnormal and zero percent dead seed crop. When delivered to the storage facility at Saatbau Linz, the value of the soya harvested using the Case IH Axial Flow harvester was recorded at 96 percent normal, four percent abnormal and zero percent dead seed - so no real difference in terms of grain disintegration and reduced germination properties. "Values that, especially for the last year with a widely divergent range of germination levels and poor weather conditions during the ripening period right across Austria, are right at the top of the league table", was the verdict expressed by Georg Landerl, a harvesting technology expert at Case IH in Austria.