• SOURCE: Siemens Corporation




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ANCHOR LEAD: The U.S. has once again boldly gone where no man has gone before as the largest and most advanced space exploration robot ever made landed on the "red planet" this week to explore a "new world," and a leading global technology company was influential in making it happen. Kate Brookes has more. (:60) SCRIPT: Newsbreak, I'm Kate Brookes. After travelling more than 350-million miles, a hyper-sophisticated, car-sized space rover called Curiosity successfully landed on Mars, and Siemens' Product Lifecycle Management or PLM software played a key roll in helping NASA's engineers get it there. Siemens PLM software developer Daren Rhoades. CUT: (Rhoades) Mars has three-eighths the gravity of Earth, and there is no dial in a room that allows you to change the gravity on Earth. The only way to simulate how something is going to behave on Mars is to do it in a virtual environment. And Siemens PLM software, allows you to change the gravitational field and test in a virtual environment. SCRIPT: Daren says designing the Curiosity was like playing a well known 80's video game. CUT: (Rhoades) On the Rover design team we used to joke like it was playing a giant game of three-dimensional Tetris. You were presented with a whole bunch of pieces that are odd shapes, and they keep coming at you and you need to adjust how they fit together before they reach the bottom. That's how designing the Rover panned out. SCRIPT: For more, visit usa-dot-siemens-com. That's Newsbreak from Siemens.
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