• SOURCE: UNICEF

In Malawi, Health Surveillance Assistants Provide a Crucial Link Between the Community and Health Care System

ID

242032

Shoot Date

31 May 2012

Shoot Location

Chimphanga Village, Malawi

Description
Mix: Video news package with English mono mix audio. Narrated by Yamikani Maganga.
Shotlist
You're watching UNICEF Television. Thirty-two year old Blessings Makono has been up since 8 O'clock in the morning conducting a "village clinic" outside his wind-swept brick house in Chimphanga Village, Malawi. Already a small group of women are seated on the dusty floor, their babies tightly wrapped behind their backs with the traditional chitenje cloth. Makono asks Mwanaisha Lubaini, a 29 year old mother of four, what is wrong with her child, noting down the information in the child's health passport. SOUNDBITE (Chichewa) Mwanaisha Lubaini, 29 year old mother of four children: " The reason I came to this village clinic today is because my child has a fever and is complaining of stomach pains. " Using the stopwatch on his mobile phone, he counts the child's heart ratem, then pulls her eyelids to reveal the inside lining. A pale lining, he later explains, means the child has anaemia. Awesha (age 4) is showing signs of malnutrition and, pressing his thumb into her feet, Makono checks for oedema. SOUNDBITE (English) Blessings Makono, Health Surveillance Assistants (HSAs) in Chimphanga village: "I assist children with diseases like diarrhoea, pneumonia, eye infection, and some other minor diseases. When I find the child has a more complicated disease, I refer them to Khombedza health centre for further management." Makono has diagnosed Awesha with malaria and immediately administers the first dose of an anti malarial drug. He also hands her mother, Lubaini, the other dose and additional medication to take home, with strict instructions to administer them at prescribed times. If nothing changes in three days, he says, the child should be brought back for further assessment. Makono is one of two Health Surveillance Assistants (HSAs) in Chimphanga village. With his colleague, Makono holds a village clinic every day of the week using a medical kit supplied by UNICEF. The kit contains antibiotics, antimalarial tablets, oral rehydration salts, and zinc. In Malawi's battle against common childhood diseases, HSAs have played a key role in bringing health care closer to the people. SOUNDBITE (Chichewa) Mwanaisha Lubaini, 29 year old mother of four children: " If it was not for this village clinic, my family and I would have to travel very long distances to get the proper healthcare needed. And getting to the next health centre would mean I would have to pay 600 Kwacha for each trip which we cannot afford. " Khombedza, the nearest health center, is 18 kilometres away from Chimphanga village. In a country where nearly half the population lives on less than a dollar a day, 600 kwacha (equivalent to around USD 2.40) is more than most poor households can afford. SOUNDBITE (English) Blessings Makono, Health Surveillance Assistants (HSAs) in Chimphanga village: "When they come here for treatment they don't pay anything because it is free of charge. " It would take Lubaini hours to walk to the health center and the sheer effort and time involved means parents are reluctant to seek medical help when their children fall sick. Makono's village clinic ensures that treatment is only a few minutes' walk away. And because Makono lives in the village, people can bring their sick children at any time. SOUNDBITE (Chichewa) Mwanaisha Lubaini, 29 year old mother of four children: "What I like about this village clinic as well is that unlike busy hospitals, here you get attended to very quickly because of the small number of patients." Malawi currently has about 12,000 Health Surveillance Assistants (HSAs). These health workers are the vital link between the village and the health system. SOUNDBITE (Chichewa) Mwanaisha Lubaini, 29 year old mother of four children: ."Mr. Makono has been a great help to my family. Last month I was here with another child of mine who got medicine and is now in very good health. I am very confident that my daughter which I brought today to the clinic will get well too with the medicine Mr. Makono gave." Malawi's HSA programme has contributed to a significant drop in the country's child mortality rates. The major childhood killers - malaria, diarrhoea, and pneumonia - are not only preventable but can be cured with the simple treatments that Makono administers at his village clinic. This is Yamikani Maganga reporting for UNICEF Television. For more information, go to UNICEF.org. UNITE FOR CHILDREN. Shotlist 1. Medium close up shot of Blessings Makono 2. Wide shot of village clinic 3. Medium shot of village clinic with mother sitting on the floor 4. Wide shot of clinic with mother wrapping her child in the traditional Chitenje cloth 5. Medium shot of Makono talking to Mwanaisha Lubaini 6. SOUNDBITE (Chichewa) Mwanaisha Lubaini, 29 year old mother of four children: " The reason I came to this village clinic today is because my child has a fever and is complaining of stomach pains. " 7. Close-up of Makono's cell phone as he takes the child's (Awesha – Age 4) heart rate 8. Wide shot of Makono taking the child's heart rate then later checking her eyes 9. Medium close up shot of Awesha with pan down to her feet while HSA presses her feet to check for 10. SOUNDBITE (English) Blessings Makono, Health Surveillance Assistants (HSAs) in Chimphanga village: "I assist children with diseases like diarrhoea, pneumonia, eye infection, and some other minor diseases. When I find the child has a more complicated disease, I refer them to Khombedza health centre for further management 11. Medium shot of Makono giving an anti malaria drug to Awesha. Awesha takes the pill with a drink of water 12. Close up shot of Makono packing pills inside a box to give Mwanaisha 13. Medium shot of Makono giving instructions to Mwanaisha when to administer the other pills to her daughter. 14. Medium shot of Mwanaisha and her daughter, Awesha 15. Wide shot of Mwanaisha, and Awesha with Makono writing down information in the health book 16. Close up of Makono face 17. Medium shot of Makono giving medicine to a child patient with a spoon while she is sitting on her mother's lap 18. Medium shot of box with medicine with Makono, a mother and child being treated in the background 19. Makono showing a packet of pills to a mother while she holds her child in her arms. 20. Medium to wide shot of Makono getting up to preparing some medication for a child 21. Close up of Makono crushing medicine with two spoons 22. Medium shot of Makono giving the crushed medicine to a baby 23. SOUNDBITE (Chichewa) Mwanaisha Lubaini, 29 year old mother of four children:" If it was not for this village clinic, my family and I would have to travel very long distances to get the proper healthcare needed. And getting to the next health centre would mean I would have to pay 600 Kwacha for each trip which we cannot afford. " 24. Wide shot of Khombedza health centre, 18 Kilometers away from Chimphanga Village clinic 25. Medium shot of inside one of the waiting rooms at Khombedza health centre with a large queue of mothers with their children waiting to be seen by a nurse of doctor. 26. Medium shot of waiting room of health centre. A mother with her child wrapped behind her back is standing giving her details to a health centre worker 27. Close up of mother smiling while getting up with her child wrapped behind her back 28. Medium shot of waiting room with a mother walking towards and across camera 29. SOUNDBITE (English) Blessings Makono, Health Surveillance Assistants (HSAs) in Chimphanga village: "When they come here for treatment they don't pay anything because it is free of charge. 30. Medium shot of Malawians walking on the road while some are pushing their bicycles on the main road to the turning to Khombedza health centre 31. Wide shot of pedestrians and cyclists on a rural background setting 32. Wide shot of cyclist turning onto a dirt road that leads to Khombedza health centre 33. Medium shot of Chimphanga village clinic with Makono, mothers and a father and son waiting their turn. 34. Medium shot of Makono giving a pack of medicine to a mother who then gets up to go with her child 35. SOUNDBITE (Chichewa) Mwanaisha Lubaini, 29 year old mother of four children:"What I like about this village clinic as well is that unlike busy hospitals, here you get attended to very quickly because of the small number of patients." 36. Close up of Makono talking with a mother and child out of focus in the background 37. SOUNDBITE (Chichewa) Mwanaisha Lubaini, 29 year old mother of four children:"Mr. Makono has been a great help to my family. Last month I was here with another child of mine who got medicine and is now in very good health. I am very confident that my daughter which I brought today to the clinic will get well too with the medicine Mr. Makono gave." 38. Medium shot of Makono checking the heart rate of a girl child while a mother holds her child 39. Close up of Makono writing dosage instructions on a packet of medicine with a baby out of focus in the background 40. Medium shot of Makono measuring the length of a child's arm 41. Extreme close up of measuring tape being put around a child's arm 42. Medium shot of Makono putting a pill on a spoon a mother is holding while camera tracks movement down right 43. Close up of mother giving her child some medicine in a cup 44. Medium shot of Makono helping to hold a child's head back while the mother gives her child the medicine 45. Close up of a baby sitting on the floor with his mother's hand partially in shot holding a health passport book
Usage Rights/Restrictions
This media asset is free for editorial broadcast, print, online and radio use. It is restricted for use for other purposes.

Contact

  • Client Relations
    TheNewsMarket